A Tasty Spin on Tradition: Chinese-Style Kangkong Recipe – Seaco Online
Left Continue shopping
Your Order

You have no items in your cart

You might like
Promotion
Read more
Seaco-online.com completes revamp of our website to bring you a better seafood buying experience!

A Tasty Spin on Tradition: Chinese-Style Kangkong Recipe

Kangkong, also called water spinach, is a widely used leafy vegetable in Chinese cooking. This versatile ingredient can be incorporated into a range of dishes, such as soups, stir-fries, and salads. Kangkong is packed with essential vitamins and minerals, making it a nutritious choice for any meal.

Fresh kangkong leaves and stems stir-frying in a wok with garlic, oyster sauce, and chili, creating a sizzling and aromatic Chinese-style dish

If you're looking to prepare a delicious and healthy dish, consider trying a Chinese-style kangkong recipe. With its unique blend of flavours and textures, this dish is sure to delight your taste buds. To make the dish even more flavourful, you can add seafood such as shrimp or squid.

To prepare a Chinese-style kangkong dish, you will need a few simple ingredients such as garlic, oyster sauce, and sesame oil. The dish is easy to prepare and can be ready in just a few minutes. Whether you're a seasoned chef or a beginner in the kitchen, this recipe is sure to impress your family and friends.

Key Takeaways

  • Kangkong is a versatile ingredient that can be used in a variety of Chinese dishes.
  • Chinese-style kangkong dishes are easy to prepare and can be made even more flavourful with the addition of seafood.
  • Kangkong is a healthy ingredient that is rich in vitamins and minerals.

Ingredient Insights

Fresh kangkong leaves and stems are being stir-fried in a sizzling wok with garlic, soy sauce, and a hint of sesame oil

When it comes to cooking Kangkong Chinese style, there are a few key ingredients that you'll need to create a delicious and authentic dish. Here are some insights into the primary vegetables, aromatic additions, and sauce and seasoning that you'll need to prepare your Kangkong.

Primary Vegetables

The main vegetable in Kangkong Chinese style is water spinach, also known as water morning glory. This leafy green vegetable has long, narrow leaves and hollow stems. It's a semi-aquatic plant that grows in water or moist soil, making it a popular ingredient in many Asian cuisines.

Aromatic Additions

Garlic is an essential aromatic addition to Kangkong Chinese style. Its pungent flavour adds depth and complexity to the dish. You can use fresh garlic cloves, minced or finely chopped, to add flavour to your Kangkong.

Sauce and Seasoning

The sauce and seasoning are what give Kangkong Chinese style its distinctive flavour. Oyster sauce is a key ingredient, providing a rich and savoury taste that complements the fresh flavour of the water spinach. Salt and pepper are also commonly used to season the dish.

Sesame oil is another popular ingredient that can add a nutty flavour to the dish. You can also use soy sauce or fish sauce to add more depth of flavour.

If you're looking to add some protein to your Kangkong, seafood is a great option. Shrimp or prawns are a popular choice, as are scallops or squid. You can also use fish fillets, such as cod or tilapia, to create a delicious seafood and vegetable stir-fry.

By using these ingredients and following the right recipe, you can create a delicious Kangkong Chinese style dish that's sure to impress.

Preparation Techniques

Fresh kangkong leaves and stems are being washed and trimmed. Garlic and ginger are being finely chopped, while soy sauce and oyster sauce are being measured out

Cleaning Kangkong

Before cooking kangkong, it is essential to clean it thoroughly. Cleaning kangkong is relatively easy and does not require much effort. Rinse the kangkong leaves and stems in cold water to remove any dirt or sand. You can also soak the kangkong in water for a few minutes to loosen any dirt or debris.

Once the kangkong is clean, remove any wilted or discoloured leaves and stems. It is essential to remove any wilted or discoloured parts of the kangkong as they can affect the flavour of the dish.

Cutting and Portioning

After cleaning the kangkong, it is time to cut and portion it. Cut the kangkong into 4-5 cm pieces, separating the stems from the leaves. The stems and leaves have different cooking times, so it is essential to separate them.

You can also portion the kangkong according to your preference. If you prefer smaller pieces, cut the kangkong into smaller portions. If you like larger pieces, cut the kangkong into larger portions.

When cooking kangkong, you can also add seafood to the dish. Seafood such as prawns or squid can add a delicious flavour to the kangkong. Cook the seafood separately and add it to the kangkong towards the end of the cooking process.

Cooking Method

Fresh kangkong being stir-fried in a wok with garlic, ginger, and soy sauce. The vibrant green leaves sizzle as they are tossed in the hot pan

Stir-Frying Basics

Stir-frying is a popular Chinese cooking method that involves quickly cooking ingredients in a hot wok or frying pan with a small amount of oil. This method is perfect for cooking kangkong as it allows the vegetable to retain its crispness and freshness.

To stir-fry kangkong, heat up some vegetable oil in a wok or frying pan over high heat. Once the oil is hot, add in the kangkong and stir-fry for about 2-3 minutes until the vegetable is tender but still has a slight crunch. Be sure to constantly stir the kangkong to prevent it from burning.

Achieving the Perfect Texture

The key to achieving the perfect texture for stir-fried kangkong is to cook it over high heat for a short amount of time. This will help to preserve the vegetable's crispiness and freshness.

When stir-frying kangkong, it is important to use a wok or frying pan that can handle high heat. A cast-iron or carbon steel wok is ideal for this as it can withstand high temperatures and distribute heat evenly.

To add some extra flavour to your stir-fried kangkong, you can also consider adding in some seafood such as prawns or squid. These seafood options will complement the dish well and add some protein to your meal. Be sure to cook the seafood separately before adding it to the kangkong to ensure that it is cooked through.

Overall, stir-frying kangkong is a quick and easy way to prepare this delicious vegetable. With a few simple steps and some basic cooking skills, you can create a tasty and healthy dish that is perfect for any meal.

Serving Suggestions

A plate of stir-fried kangkong with garlic and soy sauce, garnished with sesame seeds and red chili flakes, served alongside steamed white rice

Accompaniments

Kangkong in garlic sauce is a versatile dish that can be served with a variety of accompaniments. Steamed rice is a classic pairing that helps to balance the strong flavours of the garlic and oyster sauce. You can also serve it with other types of rice, such as brown rice or sticky rice, to add some variety to your meal.

If you want to add some protein to your meal, seafood is a great option. Prawns or squid can be stir-fried with the kangkong to create a delicious seafood and vegetable dish. Alternatively, you can serve the kangkong as a side dish with grilled or steamed fish.

Garnishing Tips

To make your kangkong in garlic sauce look as good as it tastes, try garnishing it with some fresh herbs or chopped nuts. Coriander or spring onions can add a pop of colour and flavour to the dish. Chopped peanuts or cashews can add some crunch and texture.

When plating the dish, consider using a shallow bowl or plate to show off the vibrant green colour of the kangkong. You can also sprinkle some sesame seeds on top of the dish to add some extra visual interest.

When it comes to servings, kangkong in garlic sauce can serve as a side dish for 2-3 people. If you are serving it as a main dish, you may want to double the recipe to ensure that everyone gets enough to eat.

Nutritional Information

A plate of Chinese-style kangkong with nutritional information displayed next to it

Kangkong, also known as water spinach, is a leafy green vegetable that is commonly used in Chinese cuisine. It is a low-calorie vegetable that is rich in nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a breakdown of the nutritional information for kangkong:

  • Fiber: Kangkong is a good source of dietary fiber, which is important for maintaining good digestive health. A 100-gram serving of kangkong contains around 2.6 grams of fiber.

  • Protein: Kangkong is also a good source of protein, which is essential for building and repairing tissues in the body. A 100-gram serving of kangkong contains around 2.8 grams of protein.

  • Vitamin A: Kangkong is rich in vitamin A, which is important for maintaining healthy skin, eyes, and immune function. A 100-gram serving of kangkong contains around 4,500 IU of vitamin A.

  • Vitamin C: Kangkong is also a good source of vitamin C, which is important for maintaining a healthy immune system and protecting against oxidative stress. A 100-gram serving of kangkong contains around 27 mg of vitamin C.

  • Potassium: Kangkong is a good source of potassium, which is important for maintaining healthy blood pressure and heart function. A 100-gram serving of kangkong contains around 170 mg of potassium.

  • Calcium: Kangkong is also a good source of calcium, which is important for maintaining strong bones and teeth. A 100-gram serving of kangkong contains around 120 mg of calcium.

  • Iron: Kangkong is a good source of iron, which is important for maintaining healthy blood and preventing anemia. A 100-gram serving of kangkong contains around 1.4 mg of iron.

  • Antioxidants: Kangkong is rich in antioxidants, which are important for protecting against oxidative stress and reducing the risk of chronic diseases. These antioxidants include beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin.

If you want to add a seafood twist to your kangkong recipe, you can consider adding shrimp or prawns to the dish. Shrimp and prawns are a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for maintaining heart health. You can also consider adding fish sauce to the dish, which is a common ingredient in many Chinese recipes and adds a salty, umami flavor to the dish.

Cultural Context

A wok sizzles as kangkong is stir-fried with garlic, ginger, and soy sauce. Aromatic steam rises, filling the kitchen with the savory scent of Chinese cuisine

Kangkong, also known as water spinach, is a popular leafy vegetable in Southeast Asia, particularly in the Philippines, Singapore and Malaysia. It is a versatile vegetable that can be cooked in many ways, including stir-frying, boiling, and sautéing.

Regional Variations

The way kangkong is cooked varies from region to region. In Singapore, kangkong is commonly cooked with sambal, a spicy sauce made with chillies, shallots, and belacan, a type of shrimp paste. In the Philippines, kangkong is often used in sinigang, a sour soup made with tamarind or kamias.

Historical Significance

Kangkong has been a staple food in Southeast Asia for centuries. It is believed to have originated in China and was introduced to Southeast Asia by Chinese immigrants. The vegetable was easy to cultivate and grew quickly, making it a popular crop for farmers.

If you're looking to add some seafood to your kangkong recipe, you can try adding prawns or squid. These seafood options complement the flavour of kangkong well and can be cooked together with the vegetable in a stir-fry or sauté.

Overall, kangkong is a nutritious and delicious vegetable that can be enjoyed in many ways. Whether you're in the Philippines, Singapore or Malaysia, you're sure to find a kangkong recipe that suits your taste.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I make a simple stir-fried kangkong with garlic?

To make a simple stir-fried kangkong with garlic, you will need Chinese rice wine, oyster sauce, sugar, garlic, and kangkong. In a bowl, combine Chinese rice wine, oyster sauce, and sugar. Set this aside. In a wok, add oil and sauté garlic. Add the kangkong and stir-fry until it just begins to wilt. Pour the sauce and continue to stir-fry until the vegetables are just tender but still bright green. You can also add seafood like shrimp or squid to the stir-fry for added flavour.

What's the secret to the best Chinese-style kangkong dish?

The secret to the best Chinese-style kangkong dish is to use fresh and tender kangkong leaves. Also, don't overcook the vegetables as it can turn mushy and lose its bright green colour. Adding seafood like scallops or clams can also enhance the flavour of the dish.

Can you suggest an easy way to prepare kangkong Chinese-style?

An easy way to prepare kangkong Chinese-style is to stir-fry it with garlic, oyster sauce, and soy sauce. You can also add seafood like fish or prawns for added flavour. Remember not to overcook the kangkong to maintain its crisp texture.

What are the differences between Thai and Chinese-style kangkong recipes?

The main difference between Thai and Chinese-style kangkong recipes is the use of spices and sauces. Thai-style kangkong is usually spicier and uses fish sauce, while Chinese-style kangkong uses oyster sauce and soy sauce for a savoury flavour.

How is kangkong prepared in Malaysian cuisine?

In Malaysian cuisine, kangkong is usually stir-fried with sambal belacan, a spicy chilli paste made with shrimp paste. It can also be cooked with coconut milk and turmeric for a creamy and aromatic dish.

What are some tips for cooking Filipino-style kangkong?

For cooking Filipino-style kangkong, use bagoong alamang (shrimp paste) for a savoury flavour. You can also add sliced tomatoes and onions for added texture and flavour. Be careful not to overcook the kangkong to maintain its crisp texture.